Superintendent addresses teacher shortage

Warrick County is currently facing a shortage of teachers.

File Photo

A lack of teachers has left the Warrick County School Corporation scrambling to find replacements before the start of school on Aug. 12.

With five resignations and a retirement one week before the start of school, the WCSC hopes to quickly fill the gaps. According to WCSC superintendent Brad Schneider, this is a record number of openings so close before school starts since he has been in the position.

“This is my 13th year as the superintendent, and I cannot remember a year where we’ve had so many resignations and a retirement this close to the start of school,” said Schneider at Monday’s school board meeting. “I don’t think in my previous 12 years combined we’ve had this many openings before the start of school. We’re going to be extremely busy filling those spots. Mr. Reid is working very hard with the principals to make sure we have quality teachers to fill those spots, and I’m certain we will.”


Shortages of teachers have become a trend in the state of Indiana, and Schneider expressed his concern, insisting changes needed to be made at the state level.


“The concern about the coming shortage of teachers is real,” he said. “While it has not impacted our school corporation, we are starting to feel the effects of it. This is something that is not going to improve unless the state of public education improves in the state. It is something that should scare every single person in this state. This is a real problem and is only going to get worse. We’re not going to have the quality or the quantity of candidates if we continue down this road.”

Schneider urged all at the meeting to become involved with the upcoming election. Govenor Mike Pence is up for re-election in the upcoming year, running against candidates like state schools chief Glenda Ritz and former House Speaker John Gregg.

“2016 needs to be the year of public education,” Schneider said. “People of all parties need to stand up and say ‘our kids matter and our kids matter now.’ And the people in this state need to start funding public education and respecting the teachers who work their butts off in our classrooms to educate our kids, so that we can get the best and brightest. Otherwise this state is going to suffer.”

Laura Acchiardo is a staff writer for Warrick News. Previously, she graduated from the University of Evansville with a degree in Journalism and has interned at The Message and Tucker Publishing.

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