Castle High School French teacher Nicolas Costeur traveled with 26 students to Europe to explore France in Italy in June.

After landing in Paris, they wasted no time to begin their discovery of the French capital. The first evening, students cheered on the USA women's soccer team to a victory against Chile in a World Cup game at "Parc des Princes," the stadium where the Paris Saint-Germain team plays. Their stay in the capital included walking all over the city with visits to the Louvre Museum and Versailles Palace.

Students departed Paris on the TGV (high-speed train) to the French Riviera where they visited Monaco, toured a perfume factory and enjoyed time on the beach. They continued on to Pisa, Florence, Italy and finally to Rome, where they visited the Vatican and the Colosseum. Along the way, there was much exploration of culture and history and endless tasting of local foods.

"As a native of France it was awesome to guide my students through Paris, seeing them try and enjoy the food and culture. When asked what they liked better or what they missed at home, some reported they really missed ice in their drinks. One of the things they really appreciated in Europe was the "Orangina," basically a orange based soda as well as the 3 course meal they enjoyed every single day," Costeur said. "I cannot wait to organize my next trip. Being outside of the traditional classroom is a great way for teachers and students to see the world and each other differently. My group and I, including several graduating seniors, created life long memories."

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